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    Progarchives, the progressive rock ultimate discography

    PROGRESSIVE ELECTRONIC

    A Progressive Rock Sub-genre


    From Progarchives.com, the ultimate progressive rock music website

    Progressive Electronic definition

    Born in the late 60's after the expansion of avant-gardist, modern, post-modern and minimalist experimentation, the progressive electronic movement immediately guides us into a musical adventure around technologies and new possibilities for composition. As an author or a searcher, the musician often creates his own modules and electronic combinations, deciding his own artistic and musical action. The visionary works of Stockhausen, Subotnick, John Cage ("concrete" music, electro-acoustic experimentation), La Monte Young, Steve Reich, Terry Riley (minimal, micro-tonal music) express a vision of total reconstruction in the current musical world. Luminous works such as "A Rainbow in Curved Air" (1967) and "Silver Apples of the Moon" (1967) bring an inflexion on opened forms and new ways to explore the essence and the physical aspects of sounds (through time and space). "Static" textures, collages & long running sounds, the power of technology previously exposed in ambitious classical works will have a major impact in "popular" electronic music.

    After the artisan & innovative uses of magnetic tapes, feedback, microphones, etc., the instrumental synthesis, the elaboration of global sound forms and the psycho-acoustic interactions will be sublimated thanks to the launch of the analog synth. A great improvement happened in 1964 with the appearance of the first modular synthesiser (Moog). This material (or "invention") brings the answer to the technological aspirations of many musicians, mainly after the release of the popular "Switched on Bach" (Walter Carlos) and Mother Mallard's portable masterpiece (pieces composed between 1970-73).

    At the beginning of popular essays in electronica, the pioneering technologies (in term of recording and sound transmission) will not be abandoned. For instance, "Tone Float" (1969) by Organisation (pre-Kraftwerk), "Zwei Osterei" & "Klopzeichen" (1969-70) by Kluster and "Irrlicht" (1972) by Klaus Schulze will carry on the domestication of the electric energy and the use of refined harmoniums, organs and echo machines. During the 70's decade, European groups & musicians such as Eno, Kraftwerk and Tangerine Dream will make their name in the music industry thanks to an abundant use of analog synthesisers and original electronic combinations. After weird, mysterious experimentation on conventional acoustic & electric instruments, Kraftwerk enjoyed huge success in popular music thanks to "mechanical electronic pop music". "Trans Europe Express" (1977) and "The Man Machine" (1978) figure as two commercial classics. The German spacey electronic scene launched by Tangerine Dream with their outstanding "Alpha Centauri" (1971) and Cluster "I" & "II" (1971-72) will have echoes everywhere, starting from the Berlin underground electronic scene (the Berlin School) with Klaus Schulze ("Timewind" 1974), Michael Hoenig ("Departure from the Northern Wasteland" 1978), Ashra ("New Age of Earth" 1976), Conrad Schnitzler's buzz-drones and repetitive electronics ("Zug", "Blau", Gold" 1972-74) . After several innovations always from Germany we notice the dark, doomy atmospheric manifests of Nekropolis (Peter Frohmader) in "Le culte des Goules" (1981), Asmus Tietchens in his colourful and engaged "Biotop" (1981) and the semi-ambient "Hermeneutic Music" (1988) by Lars Troschen (sound sculptor and synthesist).

    In France, the "hypnotic" and "propulsive" electronic essays of Heldon ("Electronic Guerrilla" 1974) and Lard Free ("Spiral Malax"1977) introduce an inclination for industrial, urban and post-modern sound projections. The French "avant gardist" Philippe Besombes takes back the inspiration of " concrete music" (Pierre Henry.) and mixes it to a hybrid rocking universe (published in 1973, "Libra" figures as a true classic). Bernard Xolotl in "Prophecy" (1981), "Procession" / "Last Wave" (1983), Zanov (Green Ray, 1976) and Didier Bocquet (Voyage cerebral, 1978) will follow the musical path anticipated by Klaus Schulze in his kosmische electronic symphonies.

    At the end of the 70's until the debut of the 80's Albums as "ambient 1: Music for Airports" (Brian Eno), "Cluster & Eno", "Deluxe" (Hans Joachim Roedelius side project called Harmonia) will announce the emergence of the famous ambient movement, musically characterised by gorgeous shimmering atmospheric textures.

    During the 80's, Maurizio Bianchi will be in search of the absolute industrial "post-nuclear" sound tapestry. His visionary musical experience is based on cyclical loops, abrasive concrete noises and vertiginous piano dreamscapes. ("Symphony for a Genocide" 1981 and recently the mesmerising "A.M.B Iehn Tale" 2005). Before M.B and the industrial-bruitist wave, the 70's Italian specialists of electronic experiments had been (among others) Francesco Cabiati (Mirage, 1979), Francesco Bucherri (Journey, 1979), and Francesco Messina for representative, lyrical and spacey orchestrations and also Futuro Antica (D'ai primitivi all'elettronica, 1980) or Telaio Magnetico (Live' 75) for tripped out minimalism.

    In the early 1980s and after following the kosmische path of classic Klaus Schulze, The Bay Area / Los Angeles school of electronic created the so called "alchemical" / "Sacred" space music. The music offers a dynamic combination between ancient-traditional music of the West and synthesised sonic soundscapes. The most representative artists of this movement are Michael Stream (Lyra Sound Constellation, 1983) Robert Rich (Numena, 1987) and Steve Roach (Dreamtime Return, 1988).

    In the early 80s Ian Boddy (Spirits, 1984 / Phoenix, 1986) and Mark Shreeve (Assassin, 1983 / Legion, 1984) unique spacedout synthesised sagas represented the british answer to the challenging Berlin kosmische school. Their music embodies timbral drone sequences, systematic arpeggiations and synth-pop textures.

    Young contemporary bands and artists in electronic experimentation took their inspiration from the 70's "kosmische" analog synth psychedelica of Klaus Schulze, Conrad Schnitzler, Tangerine Dream, etc. In the spaced out synthesisers spectrum, modern Japanese artists as Yamazaki Maso (noisy avant garde experimentor who contributes to the Kawabata's projects named Andromelos, Christina 23 onna and Father Moo & the Black sheeps) or Takushi Yamazaki (Space Machine) are key figures. The minimal, moody / lysergic epic soundscapes of Omit (Clinton Williams), Cloudland Canyon, Astral social club or Zombi also contribute to the renewal of the "cosmic" synth genre. Many modern electronic artists have taken an original musical direction, surfing on post-krautrock ambient waves (Aethenor), on spherical "abstract" ambient minimalism (Pete Namlook, Biosphere, Robert Henke) or on trancey, (post) industrial drone hypnosis (Alio Die / Amon / Nimh for the italian side and Andrew Chalk with his respective projects Mirror, Monos and Ora).

    To sum up things, the progressive electronic subgenre is dedicated to intricate, moving, cerebral, intrusive electronic experiences that get involved in "kosmische", dark ambient, (post) industrial, droning, surreal or impressionist soundscapes territories.

    Philippe BLACHE


    The responsibility for the psych/space, indo/raga, krautrock and prog electronic subgenres is taken by the PSIKE team,
    currently consisting of

    - Meltdowner
    - siLLy puPPy
    - Rivertree
    - Tapfret
    - HarryAngel746

    Progressive Electronic Top Albums


    Showing only studios | Based on members ratings & PA algorithm* | Show Top 100 Progressive Electronic | More Top Prog lists and filters

    4.29 | 306 ratings
    MIRAGE
    Schulze, Klaus
    4.25 | 922 ratings
    RUBYCON
    Tangerine Dream
    4.22 | 286 ratings
    TIMEWIND
    Schulze, Klaus
    4.18 | 796 ratings
    PHAEDRA
    Tangerine Dream
    4.35 | 39 ratings
    IN COURSE OF TIME
    Zanov
    4.17 | 154 ratings
    EPSILON IN MALAYSIAN PALE
    Froese, Edgar
    4.67 | 16 ratings
    DECONSECRATED AND PURE
    Alio Die
    4.42 | 24 ratings
    ARCHITEXTURE OF SILENCE
    Alpha Wave Movement
    4.16 | 72 ratings
    AN ELECTRIC STORM
    White Noise
    4.35 | 27 ratings
    LONG LOST RELATIVES
    Syrinx
    4.67 | 13 ratings
    HONEYSUCKLE
    Alio Die
    4.17 | 58 ratings
    INTEGRATI... DISINTEGRATI
    Leprino, Franco
    4.32 | 27 ratings
    THEY GROW LAYERS OF LIFE WITHIN
    Alio Die
    4.06 | 188 ratings
    AMBIENT 4 - ON LAND
    Eno, Brian
    4.22 | 39 ratings
    CATCH WAVE
    Kosugi, Takehisa
    4.02 | 474 ratings
    FORCE MAJEURE
    Tangerine Dream
    4.23 | 34 ratings
    TUSSILAGO FANFARA
    Anna Sjalv Tredje
    4.16 | 46 ratings
    ALIO DIE & LORENZO MONTANA: HOLOGRAPHIC CODEX
    Alio Die
    4.02 | 247 ratings
    X
    Schulze, Klaus
    4.25 | 27 ratings
    ABANDONED CITIES
    Budd, Harold

    Progressive Electronic overlooked and obscure gems albums new


    Random 4 (reload page for new list) | As selected by the Progressive Electronic experts team

    HARMONIC ASCENDANT
    Schroeder, Robert
    HATHOR
    Wakh関itch, Igor
    HELDON IV - AGNETA NILSSON
    Heldon
    TUSSILAGO FANFARA
    Anna Sjalv Tredje

    Latest Progressive Electronic Music Reviews


     Kojiki: A Story in Concert by KITARO album cover DVD/Video, 1999
    4.09 | 3 ratings

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    Kojiki: A Story in Concert
    Kitaro Progressive Electronic

    Review by Matti
    Prog Reviewer

    4 stars It's roughly three years since the Japanese artist Kitaro was added to PA, but very few reviews have been written. Maybe he's just too New Age-y to gain much interest among prog community. I really don't know how well he is known or appreciated today. For my generation, in the early 80's Kitaro became known mostly due to his contribution to the historical Silk Road documentary series. His career continued strongly at least through the 90's; by many he is probably seen as an artist of a bygone era. I admit I haven't kept my eye on his more recent discography very closely.

    Are music DVD's also "so last season" nowadays, in the age of internet? Well, I am a keen collector of them, and this one I found on a record fair last autumn -- I have no idea how much Kitaro stuff is available in the net.

    Kojiki: A Story in Concert is a 55-minute concert film from his 1990 world tour. It seems the show is built on a conceptual suite (Kojiki being an ancient chronicle about the creation of Japan), not a broader selection of Kitaro's output. That results as a slightly distanced relation to the audience. Not a single word is said. But the music is genuine Kitaro, in all its grandiosity and passion. The way Kitaro conducts the ensemble (which is in the beginning not even seen from the shadows) with larger-than-life gestures and spiritual facial expression is almost awkward. Fortunately the less than excellent camera work starts to show the other musicians too as the concert progresses. There are two keyboardists in addition to the man himself, making the overall sound very orchestral with the central role of violinist Charlie Bisharat.

    The two first pieces are romantically symphonic, the third piece has more emphasis on percussion -- even Kitaro and Bisharat climb to the upper levels of the stage to beat the big drums for a while. The electric guitar has no big role most of the time, except for some passionate soloing on some of the last pieces. If the listener already likes Kitaro, this concert won't be a disappointment. But maybe also those who are skeptical of his music will be convinced that it's much more than New Age pathos. Worth checking out for fans of e. g. The Enid and Vangelis appreciating the orchestral grandiosity and deep emotion in music.

     Solaris (1972 OST) by ARTEMIEV, EDWARD album cover Studio Album, 2013
    3.00 | 1 ratings

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    Solaris (1972 OST)
    Edward Artemiev Progressive Electronic

    Review by siLLy puPPy
    Collaborator PSIKE, JR/F/Canterbury & Eclectic Teams

    — First review of this album —
    3 stars It's impossible to tell the tale of EDWARD ARTEMYEV, one of Soviet Russia's top electronic performers without explaining the context of his musical development. ARTEMYEV owed much of career to Yevgeniy Murzin, the engineer and mathematician who had spent years constructing a music synthesizer called the ANS which is a photoelectronic musical instrument which made it possible to obtain a visible image of a sound wave as well as synthesizing sounds from an artificially designed sound spectogram. The name ANS was derived from the occultist and theosophist Alexander Nikolayevich Scriaban who was also famous for his development of an atonal dissonant musical system and was influenced by synesthesia.

    One of the drawbacks with Murzin's technological breakthrough was that he was unable to find a musician with a fertile enough imagination to unleash the unexplored possibilities that were lurking beneath the surface. Luckily in 1960, Murzin met ARTEMYEV who was a 22 year old graduate from the Moscow conservatory and found that ARTEMYEV was exactly who he was seeking to master the subtleties of his new creation. Although other composers such as Stanislav Kreichi, Alfred Schnittke, Edison Denisov and Sofia Gubaidulina are credited as using the ANS in their musical performances, it was really EDWARD ARTEMYEV who pushed its boundaries into the world of experimentalism and the avant-garde and thus became one of the greatest Russian composers of electronic music and is best known outside of Russia for his soundtracks for the Soviet films "Siberiade," "Stalker," "Burnt By The Sun" and this one, SOLARIS.

    The film SOLARIS came out in 1972 and was a science fiction piece directed by Andrei Tarkovsky who would employ ARTEMYEV's soundtrack talents for many of his films. The plot of the film centers around a space station orbiting the fictional planet SOLARIS where scientific missions have been postponed due to the crew suffering from emotional breakdowns. The film was instrumental in bringing a greater human touch to sci-fi which were notorious for being technologically oriented and losing the emotional connections of the characters. The film itself is considered an all-time classic and one of the most far-thinking and original films to emerge out of the Soviet Union. The film was released in an unusual manner as well having appeared at only five theaters in the entire USSR in 1972 but remained in theaters for 15 years without any breaks. All of this has given it a cult status where it still remains in the present day.

    While the film is an indisputable classic, the soundtrack on its own without the context of the film is arguable another matter altogether. In my opinion film music is often only interesting in the context of the film itself and has been specifically designed to heighten emotional reactions during the viewing. There are of course exceptions but i find soundtrack music more often than not fails to stand on its own merits and without this codependency isn't exactly a compelling listening experience without the visuals. I very much find this to be the case with SOLARIS due to the fact that the electronic music is rather abstract and only amplifies the plot of the movie. Without these anchors for experience the soundtrack itself comes off as a jumble of random movements with some fortified with J.S Bach organ pieces such as his "Ich rf' zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ, BMV 639" which can be heard strewn about the album's run.

    While taken in context with the film, ARTEMYEV scored big time in crafting a mind-bending score that reinforces the starkness of the film's intensity. In order to really comprehend this soundtrack though, you'd really have to experience it in the context of the film first otherwise this may come off as avant-garde mumbo jumbo. The soundtrack is the perfect display for the full potential of the massive ANS synthesizer and unfortunately the only prototype of the ANS was destroyed shortly after this soundtrack was recorded which adds another level of mystery to the entire situation. Generally speaking the music involved her involves ambient tones and textures and although ARTEMYEV wanted to perform an exclusively ambient soundtrack, Tarkovsky wanted tidbits of recognizable music included. If this soundtrack wasn't weird enough, it wasn't even officially released when the film debuted in 1972 but quickly emerged as a bootleg. There seems to be various releases over the years including a Columbia Records vinyl release in 1978 as well as a TCMP CD release in 1995 but this soundtrack wouldn't find a so-called official remastering until 2013 in Russia on the Мирумир label which added 10 minutes of ambient sounds to the more standard 40 minute runs of the various preceding examples.

    For those who are enthralled with dark ambient music steeped in electroacoustic bleakness with only occasional references to more standard Western classical sounds, you might find this a lot more appealing and as i stated this is a wonderful soundtrack in conjunct with the film itself but as a stand alone musical experience i can't say this one light's my fire like it seems to do with many. This is definitely a Russian classic that should be experienced simply because of the historical relevance but if you don't find this soundtrack music to top your list of progressive electronic releases don't feel bad. You're not alone. It also seems that there are at least 7 different album cover that have been released but personally i like the one with the giant space station tunnel and the bright yellow letters spelling out SOLARIS. Interestingly enough despite being completely Russian, both film and soundtrack, this has never been released with the Cyrillic alphabet or with Russian track titles to my knowledge anyways.

    3.5 but rounded down

     The Tide Of The Century by BLAKE, TIM album cover Studio Album, 2000
    3.07 | 7 ratings

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    The Tide Of The Century
    Tim Blake Progressive Electronic

    Review by Progfan97402
    Prog Reviewer

    3 stars I remember a new Tim Blake release in 2000 and it sported such a wonderful cover I expected something like a modernized Crystal Machine but I heard audio samples at the time and wasn't impressed. I've since heard the entire album and I have to say it's not bad and it's an improvement over his previous effort Magick but will never reach the heights of Crystal Machine or New Jerusalem. It had a much more professional production and sound than Magick which is a big benefit but his voice sounds just as shot as before. Also the addition of piano wasn't a good move as it seems foreign to his brand of progressive electronic. Out of the way, "Sarajevo" is by far my least favorite piece on the album. I realize it's about the atrocities committed in the former Yugoslavia as he wanted the song to be for Bosnia what Peter Gabriel's "Biko" was for South Africa. It worked for Gabriel not for Tim Blake especially where he gives it that trite '80s feel (luckily without that awful '80s production) and those bagpipes are pretty unforgiving. Blake works much better with cosmic sci-fi themes, not a socio- political statement, but having to hear what was going on in the 1990s in that area of the world upset him enough to write a song about it and for good reason.. "Tribulations" is much better than I expect given he's exploring reggae which is unusual for him. Usually artists doing reggae that has no business doing such really falls flat on their face but somehow Tim pulls it off. It's no Bob Marley but you don't expect it to be and is actually a nice piece. Much of the rest are piano and synth dominated pieces that aren't bad but the instrumental synth passages shine the most. "Byzantium Dancing" probably the most successful. As mentioned those vocals sound shot as if he's been smoking too many cigarettes. Not a masterpiece and "Sarajevo" could have easily been lost, but at least he kept the CD short at 43 minutes which could easily fit on vinyl but was never released on that format. Nice he didn't cram 75 minutes on one CD with only 40 minutes of worthwhile material. Good, not great therefore three stars.
     Phaedra by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Studio Album, 1974
    4.18 | 796 ratings

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    Phaedra
    Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

    Review by VianaProghead
    Prog Reviewer

    5 stars Review N?333

    Tangerine Dream is unquestionably one of the most influential electronic groups of all time, probably the best of all. Their music has made an immeasurable impact on ambient, new age, techno, trance, and progressive rock, as well as modern film score composition. Founded as a psychedelic rock group in 1967 by Edgar Froese, the group was initially associated with the Krautrock scene through early abstract albums, 1970's 'Electronic Meditation', 1971's 'Alpha Centauri', 1972's 'Zeit' and 1973's 'Atem'. Those albums belong of what is usually called 'The Pink Years'.They pioneered the use of sequencers and synthesizers and was only from 1974 that the classic albums appear like their greatest masterpieces, 1974's, 'Phaedra' and 1975's 'Rubycon' and 'Ricochet', which proved to be commercially successful. They became also prolific film composers. Subsequent albums in the 80's incorporated more digital instrumentation, as well as shorter, more pop oriented compositions than their earlier epics. During the 90's, with some albums they were closer to the forms of dance music that Tangerine Dream has heavily influenced. During the 21st century, the band gradually drifted back toward the sequencer driven sound they had pioneered during the 70's. Tangerine Dream is still active today having released almost 100 studio albums in their lengthy and very prolific career.

    So, it was with Tangerine Dream's debut for Virgin is rightfully and deservedly regarded as one of their definitive classics, which everything really began to the band. 'Phaedra' is one of the most important, artistic, and exciting works in the history of the electronic music, a brilliant and compelling summation of Tangerine Dream's early avant- space direction balanced with the synthesizer/sequencer technology just beginning to gain a foothold in non academic circles. 'Phaedra' showed not only that the band's set of equipment obviously had grown a lot bigger and more expensive since their early days, but also that their musical expression had evolved and progressed without losing any of the depth and mysticism of their best works in their first phase. The most noticeable new feature in their sound was the inclusion of complex, sequenced electronic rhythm patterns that slowly evolved and changed shape underneath the atmospheric sounds of Moogs, Mellotrons, flute and lots of various electronic equipments massively used in the future.

    'Phaedra' has only four tracks, but all I wrote before came into full bloom on the 17 minute title track that would set a whole new standard for the Tangerine Dream's sound. The minimalism of their first albums was pretty much gone, as the sequenced rhythms provided the band with a rich and fat sound stuffed to the rim with mystical and delightful atmospheres. Given focus by the arpeggiated trance that drifts in and out of the mix, the track progresses through several passages including a few surprisingly melodic keyboard lines and an assortment of eerie Moog and Mellotron effects, gaseous explosions, and windy sirens. Despite the impending chaos, the track sounds more like a carefully composed classical work than an unrestrained piece of noise. The climax of the track comes surprisingly enough after the sequencer has stopped, and makes room for a sinister and incredibly moody part filled with Mellotron, gongs and haunting electronic sounds, building up some of the most fantastic atmospheres ever created by humans. And to add to the feel of beyond and mystery, some distant and faint sounds of children playing can be heard several seconds after the track has ended. It's really an amazing track that would become a standard track in the next future of their music.

    While the title track takes the cake, there are three other excellent tracks on 'Phaedra'. The second side opens with the nearly 10 minute 'Mysterious Semblance At The Strand Of Nightmares' that reportedly was a pure solo number by Froese. It consists almost entirely of grandiose washes of Mellotrons, but also some spacey electronic sounds. The opening of 'Movements Of A Visionary' seems to improve the voice experiments from their previous album 'Atem'. The rest of the track consists of a warm and comforting organ improvising around the sequenced rhythms that now was one of the band's main trademarks. It's a more experimental piece, using treated voices and whispers to drive its hypnotic arpeggios. The brief piece 'Sequent C'' closes the album in a moody way, a piece of ethereal, floating beauty.

    Conclusion: 'Phaedra' is often regarded as a groundbreaking album that was shaped by an experimental sound, with structured sound sequences that present themselves to the listener in an atmosphere space like manner. 'Phaedra' leads in monotone electronics at the beginning directly into the wide world of the universe and knows how to create a monotone trance in cosmically designed sound surfaces. In the further course, the cool unapproachability of the electronics unites with organic looking mellotron inserts, which is accompanied by more rhythmic sound elements. The way into unexplored galaxies is, thus, effectively relaxed. Perhaps even more powerful as a musical landmark now than when it was recorded. 'Phaedra' has proven the test of time. The 70's was a time of music taste and intelligence, really.

    Prog is my Ferrari. Jem Godfrey (Frost*)

     Live In Paris 1976 by HELDON album cover Live, 2015
    3.08 | 5 ratings

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    Live In Paris 1976
    Heldon Progressive Electronic

    Review by Sagichim
    Special Collaborator Honorary Collaborator

    3 stars In 2006 a live album called Live Electronik Guerilla Paris 1975-1976 was released, it combined 2 live shows in Paris and included 7 tracks. In 2015 those 7 tracks were released again but separately, 5 tracks as live in Paris 75 and the other 2 tracks as live in Paris 76. This is the 1976 show and it's a nice little EP, it appears under a live album which is true but it include only 2 songs clocking at 20 minutes so it's kind of an EP. This is a nice thing to have since both tracks does not appear on any album. The lineup include Richard Pinhas on guitars and Moog, Patrick Gauthier on keys and Fran鏾is Auger on drums.

    The first track 1984 Apres Cosmic C'Etait is a simple stripped down 10 minutes jam attempt, there are no synth loops only guitar bass and drums, sounds like something they can let loose and improvise on. Gauthier plays the moog as a bass, Pinhas goes crazy on his Frippian guitar solos and Auger conducts the whole thing with his busy drumming. It starts slowly with Pinhas electric guitar until the rhythm picks up after three and half minutes, this is really good as it rocks hard, you can definitely air guitar on this baby. The second track Distribution Deterritorialisation is another typical Heldon piece, in fact it sounds to me like an early version of the second part of Bolero which is a 20 minute piece found in their 1979 album Stand By. It's based on a moog loop sequence and Pinhas electric guitar jaming on top, half way through Pinhas drops the guitar and adds a synth solo then goes back to another guitar solo until the end. It's definitely good and the playing is great but it's nothing we haven't heard before from these guys.

    So this is a nice thing to get a hold of if you're already a fan. The other live album that I've mentioned Live In Paris 75' include only guitar and synths no drums, those experimentations are interesting on their own only the problem is the sound quality which is really rough. If that wasn't changed in the reissue and stayed the same as the album released in 2006 then it's a shame. 3 stars.

     The 2008-2013 Solo Projects by THE SILVER SURFER album cover Boxset/Compilation, 2019
    4.00 | 2 ratings

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    The 2008-2013 Solo Projects
    The Silver Surfer Progressive Electronic

    Review by nick_h_nz

    4 stars [Originally published as a review on The Progressive Aspect]

    December is a black hole for new releases. I often wonder why anyone releases anything at a time of the year when most people are looking back on what has already been released, and have little money to spend on additional releases. In that last month of 2019, Rivendel keyboard player Oscar Belio chose to release four albums worth of material under the name The Silver Surfer. I think that is a great shame, as they will inevitably have sailed under the radar.

    I first came across Rivendel about five years after the release of their 1996 album, The Meaning. It would be another ten years or so before they released another, and when it was released, it was something completely different than what had come before. In retrospect, The Meaning makes quite a bit more sense. It is almost representative of the progression of sound between albums, within an album. Though that is perhaps overly simplistic, the first song does echo the debut, while the third album foreshadows the next album (at this stage, still two decades away!)

    With the release of The Silver Surfer albums, we are given more retrospective explanation of how the changes came about between The Meaning (1996) and DHD (2015). The four albums worth of material were recorded between 2008 and 2013, and DHD makes perfect sense after listening to these. I sincerely hope, though, that this is not the last we hear of The Silver Surfer. For while Rivendel's most recent release (Sisyfos) was superb and made my end of year list in 2018, I want to hear more of The Silver Surfer as well as more of Rivendel!

    The first Bandcamp tag of The Silver Surfer releases is "Berlin school" and this is a very good indicator of what you will be hearing. Classical music and mystique concr鑤e motifs abound, in a great swirling sea of progressive electronic Kosmische Musik. It's gorgeously Floydian, filled with spacey ambient soundscapes, without ever sounding derivative. My favourite Pink Floyd album is Wish You Were Here, and my favourite Floyd song, Shine On You Crazy Diamond. If you are the same, you will love The Silver Surfer.

    The Silver Surfer releases span four albums, and although I did consider reviewing each album individually, I find the way I listen to them prohibits such an easy division. This is entirely my fault, though, as I have ended up listening to them in a somewhat non- linear fashion. In fact, alphabetical! I have listened to the albums several times, in several different orders, but for me alphabetical works better than chronological.

    Thus my listening journey tends to begin with Blueshift (2011-2012), which is the only album of the four that provides one continuous suite of music, which astounds me in the way it so carefully creates sounds that conjure the appropriate visual imagery. Listen to the music, and you can see the change of seasons.

    Aestival Solstice sets the scene with some lovely electronic prog, before Wavelength Shift amps up the Floydian influence. Wavelength Shift is, quite frankly, beautiful. Rivendel is a band quite clearly influenced by King Crimson, and this shows up to a lesser degree in The Silver Surfer. With The Wrong Chord of Autumn, the Crimonesque notes hinted in the previous track are brought to the fore. Autumnus Hiemare provides the same electronic prog, Floydian and Crimsoneque mix, but in a manner almost like a short reprise of all that has come before, with the elements introduced in the same order. It also seems to serve as much as reprise of what came before, as an introduction to the following track, Andante Esoterico. This is a slow, dark and brooding piece. It is beautiful, and it conveys a real sense of time passing with its metronomic rhythm.

    Dance of the Souls in the Wind begins in my head with the vision of a snowfall. A delightful airy swirling and descending dance, again very Floydian, and again with very Crimsoneque notes. The track takes a turn about two and a half minutes in with one such Crimsoneque stroke. Has the sky suddenly darkened? It passes, and the song ends with more or less the same beautiful falling notes as it began ? though it now sounds more like rain than snow. Finally, the Arrival of Verna is bright and spritely, lush and lively ? just as one would expect from the title. And actually, this is why I find it hard to listen to just one album at a time. For me, the end of Blueshift is not entirely satisfactory. It's too, for lack of a better word, nice. I like a little darkness present to emphasise the light.

    So onto I'm Friends with Oniris (2008-2011). I really can't explain it, but Kafka at the Shore sounds as if it should have followed Arrival of Verna. My only guess is that because some of the recordings from both Blueshift and Oniris were made in 2011, and maybe these two were created around the same time. Regardless, Kafka just sounds awesome after Verna. It's like spring, but a subversion of spring. There might be light, but there is darkness and malice attacking it from all angles. The music is angular, and quite malevolent sounding at times, however, about four minutes from the end, it is stripped back almost entirely to a lone piano that is simply gorgeous. Although this provides pretty much the only solace in the track, it doesn't last, and the menace returns, albeit muted.

    At this point, I can stop listening to Oniris, and this is why I find it hard to review The Silver Surfer as individual albums. If I listen to Blueshift, I will always listen to Kafka immediately after Verna, even if I do not listen to the remaining Oniris tracks. The same happens throughout the four albums, which is not to say they are ever lacking individually, so much as I have settled into my own listening patterns.

    For an eponymous track, the second track of Oniris, The Silver Surfer sets out the stall fairly well. An electronic and Floydian soundscape that is just a little unsettling. This is followed up by Les Caves au Bord de la Mer, which starts with the quietest and most minimalist music yet. Even when additional layers and volume are added, it merely simmers with intent. The tension is palpable, without any real threat it will boil over. That said, after five and a half minutes the track really starts building, and always leaves me grinning. Definitely one of the more Crimsonesque numbers from The Silver Surfer. Finally, from this album, we have Alone in the Desert of Myself. Again, a piece which begins in a quiet and introspective way. This time, though, not so menacing, and far more melancholy. While the previous track had brooding intensity, this piece is just brooding. I have used, and will use this adjective far too much in this review, but Alone is beautiful.

    And once again, I find myself running over to another album. Just as Kafka follows perfectly from Verna, so does Advocacy for a Sustainable Weirdness from Shy Sister Zen (2011-2013) after Alone. The static-filled start of Advocacy comes in perfectly after the abrupt ending of Alone. The track proper starts after about half a minute, but those introductory noises act as a perfect segue. Even the track titles go together well in my mind, with a possible implication being that one first dwells upon oneself, before accepting oneself. This long piece starts off relatively tuneful before jumping full-on into electronic bleeps and blips. At times an acoustic piano appears to confront the electronics but it is overpowered, and retreats. It returns, and retreats, but ultimately rather than playing the beautiful notes, it is playing the weird ones. Advocacy for sustainable weirdness indeed! This track is at times dissonant and discordant, but anyone who knows prog, knows that played in the right way, that can work. And yet, by the final minutes, some resolution seems to have occurred. Beauty and weirdness can do-exist after all?

    And again, I can stop listening to Sweet Sister Zen at this point. If I listen to Oniris, I always listen to Advocacy after Alone, and if I listen to Sweet Sister, I will often listen to Advocacy alone. This is definitely not because I don't like the remaining tracks, in fact, I consider them an incredibly strong suite which I love listening to. The remainder of the album just has a quite different feel for me, so I find myself often listening to this album in two parts, rather than as a whole.

    Juego de Equivocos starts off sounding very sinister, so in a way similar to Advocacy, but behind that, we are back to the Floydian beauty we've otherwise come to expect. Advocacy appears to be an outlier rather than the norm when it comes to The Silver Surfer. Nighttime Suite follows in a similar vein. Less sinister, more mechanical, still Floydian. About halfway through the electronic bleeps and blips of Advocacy are back, but this time they are more melodic ? almost like birdsong or crickets chirping. And then that comparison becomes overt. What has sounded mechanical, sounds more natural. Everything is suitably peaceful, and I guess this is the dead of night. This lasts until the last couple of minutes, when we hear what I can only assume are the stirrings of dawn, and we end with the birdsong. This is one of several truly evocative pieces where the music is powerful enough to provoke images without recourse for vocals.

    The Dark Period begins in almost classical fashion, before returning to the machine-like rhythm that began the Nighttime Suite. Before hearing this track, I assumed that the dark referred to the night of the previous track. After listening, I think it is more about the nature of the piece. Dark sounds as if it follows the dawn, rather than precedes it. It is daylight, but any day can be dark, and this track is oppressively so. It's like a culmination of the last two tracks. The sinister Juego and mechanical Nighttime coalesce into this Dark Period, and it is absolutely one of my favourite tracks across all four albums.

    As Dark fades out, so Nanga '37 fades in. Again, it sounds to my ears a perfect sequence, and a natural follow on, leaping between albums once more, as Nanga is the first track of The Time' Chime (2009-2010). Nanga is quite dark itself. I presume the title refers to the ill-fated 1937 German expedition to ascend Nanga Parbat, when all climbers died. It would be hard not to convey that in music without sounding a little dark. Certainly, the music seems to follow an ascending rhythm, and about halfway through we are assailed by the sounds of wind. The music becomes quite intense. After this, the piece becomes quite bleak and despondent.

    Jurassic Party picks up the pace ? and pace is the operative word. It sounds like it begins with thunderous footsteps of dinosaurs. It's heavy and plodding, but not at all ponderous. This is another of the more Crimonseque pieces, and it provides welcome relief after the comedown of Nanga. It is followed beautifully by Panthalassa's Blues, where we plunge from the giants of the land, into the deep blue sea. Once more, the imagery provoked by the music is amazing. It sounds watery, it sounds immense. These two ancient themes are bookended by two pieces from more modern times. Indeed there are only four years between the Nanga '37 incident and the beginning of The Siege of Leningrad. Musically, these two have a lot in common, too, although Siege is more sustained and subdued.

    Overall, The Silver Surfer has created a series of pieces that can be listened to together or in isolation. A lot of the tracks sound as if they are part of a suite, but all can be listened to individually. Clearly, given the way I have created my own personal preferred playlist(s), there is a lot of scope for a listener to find their own pattern. I'm sure Oscar Belio did not expect someone to find as much enjoyment as I do, from listening to the four releases in alphabetical order of their titles, but even without words, The Death of the Author persists?

     Vitamins (Gandhi-Freud) by AIRAKSINEN, PEKKA album cover Studio Album, 1997
    5.00 | 1 ratings

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    Vitamins (Gandhi-Freud)
    Pekka Airaksinen Progressive Electronic

    Review by Mortte

    — First review of this album —
    5 stars As I told already in Pekka's 'Love and Addiction' review, Pekka recorded this album already in the 1975, but released it not until nineties as CDr under name 'Gandhi-Freud'. I believe those are his first fully keyboard-base recordings, atlhough 'Golden Age'-album could have recorded in same times. To me it sounds Pekka used Moog-synthesizers in this album, but there could have been also some other keyboards. Anyway I don't believe anybody else had made such sounds in Moog! I use in this review 2017-vinyl edition, that has every pieces from the original CDr-release, but also three more pieces. As the album name says, here are compositions from almost all the vitamins and many minerals, but I guess Pekka thought also important persons of the human history like Gandhi as vitamins. One of the additional track is 'Opium', but I think it's a joke or then just added into this vinyl edition because recorded in the same time.

    Album starts with 'Molybdene' that's also in 'Madam I`m Adam'-compilation. It's quite noisy, but in 'Gandhi' direction changes much calmer, although there is some sadness. Next 'Michelangelo', 'Platon' & 'Picasso' are quite restless and trembling. 'Freud' is really anguished, but direction changes again in very great 'Akupunkture 1'. It has synth sound that reminds Nico's harmonium, also there are interesting synths that sounds like bombing in the end of piece. Second version is also really great where are used backward tapes in a very interesting way. In the end of first vinyl comes first true vitamin 'B12'. All the vitamin pieces have same kind of circling soundpath around them.

    But the second vinyl starts with 'Chromium' that is the most cheerful piece in this album. I believe it also irritates many. End of third side is full of vitamins that have that same kind of base, but interesting variations. 'A' was also released in 'More Artic Hysteria'-compilation and 'E' and 'B3' were in 'Other Power'-compilation. The last side of this album starts with 'B6', then comes 'Magnesium' that reminds a lot with it's pulsing path 'Vitamin'-serie. But 'Copper' and 'Manganese' are sounding like some big animal is trying to run and ending 'Zinc' has really great, snake -alike sounds.

    This is masterpiece! I don't think you can hear these other world-sounds anywhere else! I don't believe Steven Stapleton had heard this album when he took Sperm and Pekka Airiksinen into the famous 'Nurse With Wound'-list as only Finnish acts, but I believe he also thinks this album as masterpiece! Together with 'Afrodinpankara' I think this is the essential Pekka's keyboard-base album, but recommend the last one for the beginners!

     Recurring Dreams by TANGERINE DREAM album cover Studio Album, 2019
    4.86 | 5 ratings

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    Recurring Dreams
    Tangerine Dream Progressive Electronic

    Review by alainPP

    5 stars The 93rd album of one of the dinosaurs of electronic music is released at the beginning of the year, not a best of, a normal record, what can we expect? Well, let's say it right away, it's a real sound slap waiting for you. Very famous pieces of almost 50 years of age come to your ears to give you a little balm to the heart in this period of confinement. The first piece "sequent'c" very short is worth a nice introduction because after you wait to see pass "tangram", "horizon" and "phaedra" in addition to "monolight" , all mixed, reworked, more concise of course, but long enough to let you go as in the early hours to forget time. other titles still from the period with long titles occur, but falling back on "Stratosfear" in more than 11 minutes makes it possible to realize that the soul TANGERINE DREAM remains despite the natural departures of the original members; in fact, you have here a best of TANGERINE DREAM in less than 80 minutes, but for young people who go looking in the music archives and want to know a little about what it is, you almost have the quintessence here. So, you only have one solution, get this album or to revise or to prepare to dive into their electronic and meditative universe.
     Vitae Tennis Nest by AIRAKSINEN, PEKKA album cover Studio Album, 2003
    3.00 | 1 ratings

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    Vitae Tennis Nest
    Pekka Airaksinen Progressive Electronic

    Review by Mortte

    — First review of this album —
    3 stars Pekka had really rush-year in 2003, when releasing 3 CDr:s under his own name and even 10 Cdr:s under name Ajraxin! He had released really many also in 1997 & 1998, but I think this was his peak year. When he always wanted to go into new directions this album really includes something I haven't heard in any other Pekka records I have. This release has really weird electric piano pieces. I haven't got any information, but I believe Pekka has composed these to programming some electric piano, because these pieces are so fast & difficult that I can't imagine anybody can really play them. In this year he also seemed to fascinate about palindromes and anagrams. His compilation 'Madam I'm Adam' came this year, also there are two anagrams in this album from it's name. I am reviewing here 2015-vinyl edition, that lacks 7 pieces from the original Cdr-release and has instead two pieces on that are not in the original version. Also the track order is different.

    'Vienna Estes Tint' is in the originally one piece, but in this album it has cut into three pieces. Not sure, is it exactly the same piece, because haven't heard the original Cdr at all, but in this vinyl pieces end in fading. Two first pieces starts in really melodic electric piano runs, but changes soon more chaotic. Next in the middle of these three pieces comes 'Visa Tense Intent' that sounds like two, talented children have fun with electric piano. Third part of 'Vienna Estes Tint' is quite melodic from begin to end. 'Acme Con Lent', 'Bell Eunice' & 'Lam Ice' are the most chaotic pieces in this album. 'Stress Graff No 11' is the most interesting piece in this album: with the piano it has also interesting sound effects made from the synth, sounds of breaking glass, whooshes and some percussion sounds. It really could be the music of some thriller movie. Two last pieces in the 2015 edition are from Nyks-CDr from the same year. They're both made from synths and are also really interesting. 'Hairstreak Annoyer' has distorted sounding synth playing solos, in the end there comes striking sounds, just like thunder. 'Reinsman Earthshaker' continues with those striking sounds and has in the end really winter alike synth parts.

    I believe in this album Pekka comes closer to contemporary classical music than any other his records. So if you 're a friend of that music, this might be your album. But others I really don't recommend this to be a starter of Pekka's music. I believe it's a good thing this is a shorter version of the original album, hard to believe Pekka would have left great pieces like 'Stress Graff No 11' outside this edition. Anyway first electric piano pieces and great second side rise this album into three stars.

     Love `N Addiction (McDullan) by AIRAKSINEN, PEKKA album cover Studio Album, 1997
    4.00 | 1 ratings

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    Love `N Addiction (McDullan)
    Pekka Airaksinen Progressive Electronic

    Review by Mortte

    — First review of this album —
    4 stars Pekka released himself five albums from his earlier recordings in 2015-17 as a vinyl (three first also in CD). This album was first one of those. Originally it was released as Cdr under name McDullan in 1997. Pekka had four aliases, three others are Ajaraxin, Gandhi-Freud & Xe. McDullan was originally Is?father)Mc Dullan that he used in the classic Sperm-e.p. "3rd Erection". Although "Works"-box put together all Pekka磗 released works from seventies, he recorded then more that he released later. This album was recorded 1978 and least there are "Vitamins"-album recorded in 1975. You can hear these albums were recorded in the same Pekka磗 style period. Both of these albums includes the wildest Pekka磗 electronic music.

    Starter "Snow Rain Of Red Flowers" is really hyperactive piece. It could be described almost really weird, twisting rave. Same mood continues into next "Yellow Sunshine", but it has quite chirping synth sound in it. In the end synths goes softer and there is also repeating sound, like some radar. "Kotka-Rankki" is a little bit softer, but only a little. But in the "Good News From Columbia" the rave continues! Although Pekka was already Buddhist in the time of recording and didn磘 use any drugs anymore, I believe this first side of the album describes really well the mad passionate life of a drugaddict!

    But the album mood really changes into B-side. It starts with some really strange sound, like some soft elevator or air conditioning -equipment with drums, percussions and sax. I believe Antero Helander is playing sax although there is no information about the musicians in any album version. Soon comes really erotic electric piano. Then rhythm goes faster and stops and this repeat many times. In the second "Eros" there are also weird, a-side sounding synth in the beginning and no drums & percussions. In the last "Eros" there are just electric piano & sax, but in the middle there comes some synth also. This side really could be the music of some erotic film!

    All the way this is again very interesting Pekka-album, but not same kind of masterpiece as for example "Afrodipankara". Mood changing between album sides is really great, on the other hand changes in pieces in both sides aren磘 very big. Anyway not any boring moment in this! Also there is really great philosophy in the back of this album: there really is a big connection in love and addiction. Both can destroy and you can always try to control both. On the other hand life would be very boring without love at all and any addictions (just drinking coffee when writing this). If this review woke your interest, I recommend to listen first "Afrodipankara".

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